ANTIC Interview 305 – David Seuss, co-founder of Spinnaker Software

David Seuss, co-founder of Spinnaker Software This interview is with David Seuss, co-founder of Spinnaker Software. Spinnaker was one of the first companies to focus exclusively on educational software. Spinnaker’s software line-up included Snooper Troops, Delta Drawing, FaceMaker, Adventure Creator, In Search of the Most Amazing Thing, KinderComp, and many other titles. This interview took place on September 11, 2017. Teaser quotes: “We invented the educational software market. It really didn’t exist until we came along.” “We were making out first packaging run, we’re just so excited, and all the packages melted! Oh no.” Interview with Bill Bowman, Spinnaker CEO

Source:: ANTIC Interview 305 – David Seuss, co-founder of Spinnaker Software

      

ANTIC Interview 304 – Hal Glicksman, Datamost

Hal Glicksman, Datamost Hal Glicksman was head of the book division at Datamost. In two years from 1982 to 1984, Datamost was one of largest publishers of computer books. In 1983 alone, Datamost published over 40 titles and shipped 100,000 books per month. Their Atari books included Atari Roots, Kids and the Atari, ABCs of Atari Computers, and The Elementary Atari. Hal himself wrote The Musical Atari, Games Ataris Play, and The Musical Commodore. Datamost also published software: the company’s Atari software titles included Cohen’s Towers, Cosmic Tunnels, Jet Boot Jack, Mr. Robot and His Robot Factory, and The Tail of Beta Lyrae. This interview took place on April 7, 2017 for me; April 8 for him in France. “It was a second career for me. I was the oldest person there, older than the boss by 10 years, almost. And for me to be able to get in with all these young people and learn — I mean, I wasn’t as fast as any of them but, just to hold up my own.” A video version of this interview is available. Otis Art Institute Interview with Gary Koffler, VP at Datasoft and Datamost

Source:: ANTIC Interview 304 – Hal Glicksman, Datamost

      

ANTIC Interview 303 – Lee Konowe, American Software Club

Lee Konowe, American Software Club Lee Konowe was founder of American Software Club, a mail-order software company. American Software Club sold software for CP/M, Atari 8-bit, TRS-80, Apple II, IBM PC, Commodore 64, and other platforms. It started out with a sort of Columbia House “software of the month” model, where you automatically received a “choice of the month” software package each month — which you could keep and pay for, or return at no cost. Later the company switched to a more traditional mail order catalog model. The company was founded around June 1981. In an article about software clubs in InfoWorld magazine, the company said it had about 2,000 members by the end of its first month. By February 1983 it claimed 10,000 members, and by September of that year had 15,000 members. This interview took place on June 7 2017 for me, and June 8 for Lee in New Zealand. “>A video version of this interview is also available. “Very quickly it occurred to me that there was a need to put people who were producing software together with people who were consuming it.” American Software Club ad in H&E Computrpnics magazine, 1982 (page 11) American Software Club ad in A.N.A.L.O.G. Computing magazine, 1983 American Software Club ad in PC Magazine, 1983 1981 InfoWorld article about software clubs

Source:: ANTIC Interview 303 – Lee Konowe, American Software Club

      

ANTIC Interview 302 – Patricia Mitchell, Thorn EMI

Patricia Mitchell, Thorn EMI Patricia Mitchell started at Thorn EMI in 1981. She worked in the home computer software division, evaluating software that had been submitted by programmers. Thorn EMI published many games for the Atari 8-bit computers, including River Rescue, Carnival Massacre, Orc Attack, Kickback, Submarine Commander, Computer War, and Jumbo Jet Pilot. Later she worked at Virgin Games. This interview took place on April 27, 2017. In it, we talk a little about about Steve Green. Steve bought Patricia’s old Atari computer on eBay, which included pre-production versions of five Thorn EMI games. Steve made ROM dumps of those games and uploaded them to Internet Archive. “>A video version of this interview is available. “One of the most embarrassing things for the management at the time was they turned down a game that was submitted that was called Elite … It was the first 3-D graphics that were rendered in wireframe.” Steve Green’s ROM dumps: River Rescue Pre-Production Orc Attack Pre-Production Major League Hockey Pre-Production Computer War Pre-Production Carnival Massacre Pre-Production

Source:: ANTIC Interview 302 – Patricia Mitchell, Thorn EMI

      

ANTIC Interview 301 – James Burton, APX Drawit

James Burton, APX Drawit James Burton published one program for the Atari 8-bit computers: Drawit, a graphics utility that was published by Atari Program Exchange. It first appeared in the summer 1983 APX catalog, where it was awarded first prize in the personal development category. This interview took place on August 24, 2017. “Many hours. Many, many hours. Late at night, don;t want to go to sleep. Just plugging at the computer.” Drawit in the summer 1983 APX catalog Download Drawit from AtariMania

Source:: ANTIC Interview 301 – James Burton, APX Drawit

      

ANTIC Interview 300 – Lance Leventhal, Author of Assembly Language Books

Lance Leventhal, Author of Assembly Language Books Lance Leventhal wrote 25 computer books, spanning 1978 through 1992. His books include 6502 Assembly Language Programming, 6502 Assembly Language Subroutines, Z80 Assembly Language Programming, Z80 Assembly Language Subroutines, 6800 Assembly Language Programming, 6809 Assembly Language Programming, and Why Do You Need a Personal Computer? This interview took place on August 25, 2017. “Be careful about avoiding sidetracks. Don’t go down them. There’s always things you’d like to say and things you’d like to talk about. But they’re not central to your topic and you’ve got to be brutal about not saying them.” Scans of many of Lance’s books at Internet Archive

Source:: ANTIC Interview 300 – Lance Leventhal, Author of Assembly Language Books

      

ANTIC Episode 45 – Open Atari

In this episode of ANTIC The Atari 8-bit Computer Podcast: Mike Maginnis of the Open Apple and Drop III Inches podcasts joins the Antic crew and starts a computer war, Nir Dary tells us about disk drive upgrades, we catch up with Curt Vendel about his projects including the 2nd Atari history book, and more Atari news than you can possibly imagine!

READY!

Recurring Links

Floppy Days Podcast

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AtariMagazines.com

Kevin’s Book “Terrible Nerd”

New Atari books scans at archive.org

ANTIC feedback at AtariAge

Atari interview discussion thread on AtariAge

ANTIC Facebook Page

AHCS

Eaten By a Grue

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Interviews

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Possible side effects of listening to the Antic podcast include stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat; drowsiness, dizziness, feeling nervous; mild nausea, upset stomach, constipation;

increased appetite, weight changes; insomnia, decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; dry mouth, intense hate of Commodore, and Amiga lust. Certain conditions apply. Offer good for those with approved credit. Member FDIC. An equal housing lender.

Source:: ANTIC Episode 45 – Open Atari

      

ANTIC Interview 299 – John Skruch, Atarisoft

John Skruch, Atarisoft John Skruch worked at Atari from 1982, under Warner Communications, all through the Tramiel era, until 1998 when the company was owned by JTS. During that time, he was operations manager for Atarisoft, the arm of Atari that produced software for competing computer systems; software product manager for the 8-bit computer line; and director of licensing. He was involved wth the design and development of the XM301 modem, and the Atari Lynx game system. This interview took place on March 18, 2017. “Atari was bleeding. We used to kid that there was a guy who would go up on the roof every day at noon and toss a million dollars off the roof, and come back inside.”

Source:: ANTIC Interview 299 – John Skruch, Atarisoft

      

ANTIC Interview 298 – Tom Hunt, Closer to Home BBS

Tom Hunt, Closer to Home BBS Tom Hunt ran an Atari BBS called Closer to Home for 28 years. He also created a variety of utilities for the Atari 8-bit computers, including M.T.O.S. (Multi-Tasking Operating System), and The Armorizer (a file corruption detector). He created several languages including Atari implementations of the Brainfork and Mouse programming languages, and forks of Atari BASIC and Turbo BASIC with various feature additions. He also built a system for porting Inform 5 and Z-Code text adventures to the Atari platform. This interview took place on August 5, 2017. “Just as soon as one caller would get off another one would come on. We had so much going on, before the Internet we had worldwide networking — we had message bases, emails, and file mail going around the world to Christchurch, New Zealand and everything. It was just great!” Tom Hunt Atari memories document

Source:: ANTIC Interview 298 – Tom Hunt, Closer to Home BBS

      

ANTIC Interview 297 – Robert Anschuetz, Eric Anschuetz, John Weisgberber, Antic magazine games

Robert Anschuetz, Eric Anschuetz, John Weisgberber, Antic magazine games Robert Anschuetz, Eric Anschuetz, and John Weisgberber are childhood friends who published three games in Antic magazine: Kooky’s Quest was published in the February 1985 issue; Overflow in July 1985; and Robot Dungeon was the “disk bonus” in the November 1985 issue. They also wrote several other games in Atari BASIC — some of which they submitted to Compute! and A.N.A.L.O.G. Computing magazines – that went unpublished. Fast forward to August 2017, when the three posted on the AtariAge forum: “We are now releasing all of these games to the Public Domain … These are not new games, but they are new to the Atari 8-Bit community. Many of these games really pushed the envelope at the time for what could be done in Atari BASIC, including bi-directional smooth scrolling, assembly language subroutines, parallax scrolling, cut scenes, attract modes, display-list tricks, interleaved-displays, etc.” In addition to releasing their games — some for the first time — the group wrote a new article describing how they got together as a team to write these programs, along with game instructions and development notes. I wanted to find out more, so we got together for a four-way interview over Skype. If you want to see our talking heads, there’s a “>video version of this interview. This interview took place on August 4, 2017. The first voice you’ll hear after mine is Robert Anschuetz. Teaser quotes: “It was just a small little corner of the page that says ‘Disk Bonus — Robot Dungeon’. We didn’t subscribe to the disk bonus of Antic. So luckily we saw that or else we never would have known it was published.” “One thing about this experience of working together on these games, it’s very multi-disciplinary, and it’s all about collaboration.” “>Video of this interview Anschuetz/Weisgberber games and article

Source:: ANTIC Interview 297 – Robert Anschuetz, Eric Anschuetz, John Weisgberber, Antic magazine games